Lawn Bowls

Photograph of men's lawn bowls

As one of the core sports of the Commonwealth Games, Lawn Bowls is strongly represented throughout the Commonwealth, and Glasgow 2014 will feature a number of former or aspiring world champions.

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This sport arguably offers the most diverse group of competing athletes, from all age groups and backgrounds.

To get started playing Lawn Bowls, the basic equipment is a level playing surface, foot mats and target ball (jack). Players require flat soled shoes and a set of bowls.

The object of the game is to get one or more of your team's bowls closer to the jack (a little white or yellow ball) than your opponent's.

Games can be singles (one player per team), pairs (two players per team), triples (three players per team) or fours (four players per team). The number of bowls per player is determined by the number of players per team.

At the Games, athletes demonstrating accuracy and nerve will contest singles, pairs, triples and fours events, beginning with a round robin format before knockout finals determine the medal winners. The programme will also include fully integrated competing Para-Sport athletes.

Governing body

Bowls Scotland is the national governing body for outdoor Lawn Bowls in Scotland. It was formed in 2010 after both the Scottish Bowling Association and the Scottish Women's Bowling Association voted for unification.

Their aim is to widen awareness and increase participation in what is already one of the most popular and successful sports in Scotland.

History

Bowls historians believe that the game developed from a game played by the ancient Egyptians. One of their pastimes was to play skittles with round stones. This has been determined based on artifacts found in tombs dating to around 5000 BC. The sport spread across the world and took a variety of forms, 'bocce' (Italian), 'bolla' (Saxon), 'bolle' (Danish), 'boules' (French) and 'ula miaka' (Polynesian).

The oldest Lawn Bowls site still played on is in Southampton, England. Records show that the green has been in operation since AD 1299.

In the modern era the game is dominated by Scotland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and England as well as Ireland and Wales. However, there are over 47 countries who are members of World Bowls.

Venues

Other websites

  • Bowls Scotland

    Bowls Scotland aims is to widen awareness and increase participation in what is already one of the most popular and successful sports in Scotland.